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Tom
Reply with quote  #1 
I got me an off-road bicycle. A used Jamis Roughneck. Practically new, saved almost 45%.

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Joe
Reply with quote  #2 
I can't get over the size of the trending tire size these days. I see them all the time riding around Burlington. I assume the fatties just make for better grip in the woods/mud/sand. Makes sense...... Does look odd.

Like the funny looking pair of skis I now ride. Enjoy Tom!
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Tom
Reply with quote  #3 
They make no sense at all on roads, except in the middle of winter. They're heavier and slow, with lots of rolling resistance. But on rough, rocky trails or trails covered in leaves, mud, loose gravel, sand, or snow they're amazing. You can roll up, over, and down just about anything without slipping.

I think I'm going to like this bike a lot. It brings back the fun in bicycling.  [smile]
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DP
Reply with quote  #4 
Tom I think the tires have been over inflated
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Tom
Reply with quote  #5 
Fat tires!

They're 4.5" tires that probably have a 5" wide footprint while riding. They just seem to float over rocks and sticks. They're rated from 5 to 30 PSI and I'm running them at 15 PSI right now. Will do some experimenting once I get used to 15 PSI.
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Bob
Reply with quote  #6 
You are going to love it. You got a simple full suspension ride. I have old school complicated bikes. I get good service and lots of fun with a 2.4" tire but I am getting passed lately by fat bikes. They are piloted by strong riders too. Same story I got one and its more fun. Less shit to deal with and they handle great. Tom you should go ride Chandler Ridge. Your bike would work great on that trail.

I am riding somewhere Sunday
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Tom
Reply with quote  #7 
Bob, I won't be riding today but maybe we could ride Chandler Ridge some day in the next couple of weeks. I'm busy finishing things up at work, but I'll have lots of time to ride after June 30. I don't ride fast but I like to try new trails.


So you bought a fat bike and didn't tell anyone? Embarrassed 'cus you're abandoning your fancy mtb? [wink]
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Bob
Reply with quote  #8 
No Fat bike for me for a bit. I am leaning that way but I have many years left on the bikes I have. As our trail system ages the root/rock percentage grows. The Fat bike might just be the answer to smoothing out the lines. I do wonder about the soil displacement those fat tires cause compared to the 2-3 " tire. I see higher corner speeds, louder rolling noise so I wonder if the fatties toss more dirt.

Chandler is a great trail. You get a 2 mile climb on a fire road to Silver lake. Then a 5 mile ridge run on single track. Then you can choose to take two different ways back or just reverse the trail you came in on. Silver lake is a very nice place. I bet its great to fly fish on in the evening.

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Tom
Reply with quote  #9 
If fatbikes are ridden by normal people like me, they should actually reduce the amount of wear and tear on a trail. Slower speeds, lots of flotation, and with the additional traction you don't slip out very often.

But I thought about the potential for fatbikes to tear up trails after watching some aggressive mtb riders ripping up hills and around corners. If they were riding a fatbike in race mode, trying to get maximum speed, then I could imagine that the additional traction would just encourage aggressive riders to push the limits of the fat tires and end up spinning dirt and gouging corners.

Probably the worst scenario is if fatbikes are used when the conditions are really muddy and soft and riders keep widening the trail going around mud holes.

I guess we'll see what happens. I'd hate to see fatbikes banned from mtb trails because a few aggressive riders ruin it for the rest of us.
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Bob
Reply with quote  #10 
We rode the Preston Loop and then climbed Jimmy Cliff to the top above Cochran's. Then we came across the connector and returned. The River trails both ways to. About killed me. I got to the Van and one leg was all cramped up. Big ring on the River trail was too much for me at the end. Really Hot, took a nap after. Those trails are so nice, mostly dirt and well placed. They are dry and all clean too. Must be 20 bridges now on that loop.
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Shane
Reply with quote  #11 
The rule of thumb for mud holes is to ride through them. Going around them is strongly discouraged for obvious reasons.
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Bob
Reply with quote  #12 
Clearly its not obvious to a number of riders. I dont like my drive line fouled with mud. A persistent mud hole is a sign the trail needs to be adjusted. A re-route or a bridge of some kind is needed for the level of use that trail is seeing. Lensing as its called is evident at every single mud hole I come across. Spreading the trail use over a wider cross section until such time the trail is adjusted to prevent it. Seems like thats what happens on public trails.

So when is the next after work ride?
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Tom
Reply with quote  #13 
I'm really enjoying' the trails in Pine Hill Park with my fat bike! I can now clean sections of rocky trail that used to stop me in my tracks with the old hard tail MTB.

Life is good. [thumb]

PS: They do a fantastic job of trail maintenance. No mud holes anywhere; bridges, culverts, and turnpike take care of the problem spots.
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Joe
Reply with quote  #14 
Glad to hear you're making use of the fatties. It certainly makes sense they work better on rough terrain. I love when you see or should I say hear, the fattie bikes tracking the streets of Burlington. They're really loud, which makes it safer for the rider. Kinda like a loud exhaust motorcycle. 


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Tom
Reply with quote  #15 
"... like a loud exhaust motorcycle."


Harleys suck. You can't hear them until they've passed you anyway. Riders should use the horn if they want to warn you.  Or install the exhaust pipes backwards. [rolleyes]
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Joe
Reply with quote  #16 
Tom, I have never bought into the idea loud pipes make it safer for motorcyclist. Being visible makes for a safe ride. My bright yellow windbreaker isn't very cool looking, but it works, and add to that, I don't ride at dawn or dusk/night. I swear, I've never had anyone pulling out in front of me, or side swiping me, or go into a cardiac arrest because of my pipes, and I rarely have to deal with wildlife. My pipes are muffled, but they're not exactly quiet either..... just right. 

It is pretty obvious why the law allows straight pipes on motorcycles.
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Bob
Reply with quote  #17 
Loud pipes kinda suck. I probably have 1-2000 bikes pass my house on a sunny Saturday. There are always a few who feel like they have to make as much noise as possible.

Joe I cant believe you have not had people in cars make you avoid them. I only have a little over 300 miles in this year and already three people have pulled out in front of me causing me to brake. Some drivers just stick their car in the gap. If they can get in the lane before I get there they do it. Then there is the oncoming car going around a biker and violating my lane causing me to move way over to make way for them. This happens too many times to count. Drivers are in a hurry and safety be damned. How dare you think they should slow down and wait for a safe time to pass. We have a crop of assholes behind the wheel piloting an extension of their living room. Phones, loud music, eating, doing just about everything while driving like its normal. 30,000 dead, more then 100,000 injured every year. All mistakes made by a driver as far as I am concerned.
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Joe
Reply with quote  #18 
Bob, I left out that when coming to an intersection or spot someone waiting to get out in traffic, I get real defensive. I mean, I put on a show, with flashing lights, erratic motion on the bike, rev up the engine, and if the driver even looks like he or she is going for it, I brake a bit, and give a very aggressive finger wave. Don't fuck with me and you'll be fine..... Fuck with me, and you're going down..... Not me asswipe!

You should see how I deal with the crossing the center line assholes. Especially driving the van. I end up scaring them way more than they did me. 
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Bob
Reply with quote  #19 
I often yell at the lane violators. Right as they pass they get it, if i time it right they get a good "Asshole". My guess is they don't have a clue. Too many people have been driving their whole life like that. Their jerky behavior is now a habit done without thought. They would probably argue that it's how you are suppose to drive. Man is it hot down here in PA. 90 degrees and humid. Hiding in AC, roll back to Vt in the morning towing a trailer. Rt81 is a trucker gauntlet never seen so many Semis on the road.
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Tom

Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #20 
Perfect afternoon for a ride in the park. Sunny, no snow, mostly dry conditions. 

I wish I had the money to ski Killington, it looked like it was a great day up there with all the fresh snow.
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Bob
Reply with quote  #21 
I am envious you got to ride. It would have been nice out in the woods. The lull in armed hunters would have allowed passage on trails that have been closed for a while. This rain is going to hit the snow pack pretty hard up this way. The lower half of MRG was barely skiable, after a few days of rain its going to be back to dirt.
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Tom

Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #22 
I'm afraid that periodic rain is going to be the new normal during Vermont winters. With any luck the ski areas can make enough snow in-between to keep things skiable. But there is a limit to what they can do. Last year at Sugarbush there were patches of trail where the snow was completely saturated with rain and it turned into glacier ice.
I'm thinking of picking up a pair of razor-sharp racing skis for the "hard pack". [icon_daffy]
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Bob
Reply with quote  #23 
Yes you need to go when its snowing or very soon after if you want to ski. Our new normal seems to be a dump followed by a warm up. My friend Julie has 13 ski intervals so far, mostly skinning up once and skiing down. That's pretty good for two snow events.

 I am looking for a fat bike if you see a used one for sale. I think that would make winter riding more fun. I think I rode each month last winter. Frozen dirt is pretty fun. 
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Tom

Registered:
Posts: 55
Reply with quote  #24 
I'd check out demo bikes at bike shops. I got a great deal on my Jamis at Green Mountain Bicycles.

Winter riding is one of the main reasons I bought my fat bike. It gives me something to do when the skiing conditions really suck. I wore my ski helmet for riding yesterday and it was nice and warm. Much better than having to wear a hat under my bike helmet.

I need to buy a skinning "pass" for Pico and try out the skiing. They're closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays so should be hardly anybody there.
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Bob
Reply with quote  #25 
A skinning pass is interesting? They might be attempting to see how popular it is by regulating it a bit. Looks like its cheap. 

I am looking on CL everyday. I will find a Fat bike eventually for a good price. Pink Bike has a ton of them. 


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